Improving Customer Experience (CX) Through Better Sales Execution

 

Posted By Deirdre Sommerkamp | May 20, 2014

 

I attended the CXPA Insight Exchange last week in Atlanta. As an active member of the CXPA, early adopter and practitioner of Customer Experience (CX), there is nothing better than being with my fellow members who deeply desire to advance CX management practices and develop, manage, optimize and envision how organizations interact with their customers.

Speaking at the Rapid Innovation Showcase was an opportunity for me to share with fellow members how our team is improving customer experience through better sales execution by using a combination of Sales Playbooks & Analytics technology and strategic consulting services.

How, you ask? Here are two simple ways:

  1. Change sellers’ behavior to focus on the needs of each customer or buyer by serving up role-based and challenge-based stages, plays and content to help sellers present value that resonates
  2. CX leaders working with sales teams can take the usual sales process stages (e.g., Qualify, Discover, Propose, and Close) and turn it inside out to become buyer-centric and focused on the way buyers buy, not on the way sellers sell.

With our Sales Playbooks & Analytics solution, we have over 40 Qvidian data fields such as play name, last play completed with date and time, next play to complete and play items used into Salesforce so they can be combined with existing data fields. (Not familiar with what a play is? Check out this video for more info). Your sales team’s touch points with customers and buyers are mapped out in Playbooks and the Analytics provide visibility.

Whether influencing change in a non-CX driven culture or working in an organization where CX has full executive support, CX is about change. Holistically changing corporate culture is not easy. It takes vision, a long-range plan, a commitment to excellence and trusted relationships. It takes teamwork.

THOUGHTS FROM AN UNLIKELY SOURCE:
The Great Northern Geese travel thousands of miles in perfect formation, and therein lies the secret. As each of 
the great birds moves its wings, it creates a steady uplift for the bird behind it. Formation flying is 70 percent more efficient than flying alone.
 
LESSON:
People who share a common direction and sense of community can get where they are going quicker and easier because they’re traveling on the strength of one another.